ageofdestruction:

spectrum: The Sun, photographed by Solar Dynamics Observatory, 28th August 2014.

10 frames; each frame is a composite of 3 images in different wavelengths. Here, I have used 3 wavelengths in the extreme UV range (17.1, 19.3, and 21.1 nm), for the blue, green, and red channels which usually represent visible light of about 475, 530, and 680 nm, respectively.

Sequence covers about 11 hours.

Image credit: NASA/SDO, AIA/EVE/HMI. Animation: AgeOfDestruction.

Reblogged from Human Orbit
s-c-i-guy:

A User’s Guide to the Human Body: The Muscle Edition
This infographic describes skeletal muscles, which are structurally different from heart muscle and the smooth muscle that controls digestion. Unlike heart and smooth muscle, skeletal muscle can be voluntarily controlled.
source

s-c-i-guy:

A User’s Guide to the Human Body: The Muscle Edition

This infographic describes skeletal muscles, which are structurally different from heart muscle and the smooth muscle that controls digestion. Unlike heart and smooth muscle, skeletal muscle can be voluntarily controlled.

source

Reblogged from Elucidate
No one is dumb who is curious. The people who don’t ask questions remain clueless throughout their lives.
— Neil DeGrasse Tyson (via attackonstudying)
Reblogged from Dagothar's Den
spacettf:

Z96A6592cKleinFINAL by Peter Hauri on Flickr.
Reblogged from Astronomy4all
thekidshouldseethis:

From “science on a budget” YouTuber Nick Moore, watch this drop of mercury being vibrated from ~120Hz down to ~10hz. Higher frequencies = more complex shapes and patterns. 
Watch the entire sequence.

thekidshouldseethis:

From “science on a budget” YouTuber Nick Moore, watch this drop of mercury being vibrated from ~120Hz down to ~10hz. Higher frequencies = more complex shapes and patterns. 

Watch the entire sequence.

Reblogged from Megacosm

misandry-mermaid:

unwinona:

THIS

This is how you feminist ally.

spacettf:

NGC 7635, The Bubble Nebula by Tim Stone on Flickr.
Reblogged from Megacosm
Reblogged from itrunsevendeeper

spaceplasma:

Comet ‘Siding Spring’ headed for close encounter with Mars

Mars is about to dodge a cosmic snowball on this Sunday. On October 19, Comet Siding Spring will pass within 88,000 miles of Mars – just one third of the distance from the Earth to the Moon! Traveling at 33 miles per second and weighing as much as a small mountain, the comet hails from the outer fringes of our solar system, originating in a region of icy debris known as the Oort cloud.

Comets from the Oort cloud are both ancient and rare. Since this is Comet Siding Spring’s first trip through the inner solar system, scientists are excited to learn more about its composition and the effects of its gas and dust on the Mars upper atmosphere. NASA will be watching closely before, during, and after the flyby with its entire fleet of Mars orbiters and rovers, along with the Hubble Space Telescope and dozens of instruments on Earth. The encounter is certain to teach us more about Oort cloud comets, the Martian atmosphere, and the solar system’s earliest ingredients.

  • For more information, click here

Credit: NASA/GSFC

Acorn from Madeline Sharafian on Vimeo.

Hello again everyone! Here’s my 3rd year Calarts film! I hope you enjoy it!
Growing up is hard, but it’s also beautiful. We can do it!

My composer, Michael Kennedy: mkennedymusic.com/
Other CalArts Films: vimeo.com/channels/calartscharanimfilms2014

Animated in TV Paint, Backgrounds done in Photoshop and composited in After Effects!

Omelette from Madeline Sharafian on Vimeo.

Finally my 2nd Calarts film is completed! It feels really great to make a more personal film this year, now that I know the ropes of filmmaking a bit better. I wanted to make something that focuses on how meaningful it is to make food for someone you love. My family’s lives practically revolve around cooking for each other, so it’s a theme that I’m deeply attached to. I hope you enjoy it!

princess-peachie:

This is super deep…

Reblogged from The Zeitgeist